Granada and the Alhambra

Granada and the Alhambra

By TML


Granada and the Alhambra

"A pearl set in emeralds"
as Moorish poets described the palace

Build as a small fortress in AD 889 and converted later into an Islamic royal palace by Jusuf T, Sultan of Granada. We visited Granada and fell in love on the first sight with the ancient city located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains. The Moors occupied Spain for hundreds of years and their influence on Spanish culture, architecture, music, food and language is most notable here in Andalusia. The Emirate of Granada was the last Muslim dynasty on the Iberian Peninsula to capitulate in the Catholic Reconquista. It was the last city to fall and endures today as the place where the old Moorish Spain feels most present. After Córdoba and Seville were reclaimed by the Catholic Kingdoms in the 13th century, Islamic refugees fled to Granada, where the Nasrid Emirate had established a separate state for themselves. The Nasrids had taken up residence in a lavish royal palace high up on a hill in the heart of the city. They reigned for more than 250 years from the Alhambra before finally succumbing to the besieging Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile in 1492. Today the Alhambra is a UNESCO World Heritage site and Spain's most significant monument with 8,500 visitors every day!

 
Melisa trying Piononos, the traditional pastry of Granada

Melisa trying Piononos, the traditional pastry of Granada

Elena in the famous gardens of the Alhambra palace

Elena in the famous gardens of the Alhambra palace

Granada
 

Read the full article on page 148 in the TML Magazine Issue 2.